Biblical History

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Discussions over the textual formation and the authorship of the Bible are a matter of serious debate within the world of Biblical scholarship. On one side of the discussion, conservative-evangelical biblical scholars (not all; more specifically, “fundamentalists”) often begin with the premise that the Bible is sacred, inerrant, inspired, and historically accurate. In counterargument, critical scholars—some of whom also believe that the Bible is the word of God—do not begin with this same premise—and thus, they do not feel the need to view the Bible as historically flawless.

Read More Inerrancy, Inspiration, and the Authority of the Bible (My View)

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Hahn begins his article by acknowledging the three most prominent positions concerning the identity of “all Israel” in Rom 11:26a. He defines them as follows: (a) “Ethnic Israelism,” which describes all Israel as “biological descendants of Jacob/Israel” (65). (b) “Ecclesial Israelism,” which identifies, “all Israel as the church composed of both Jews and Gentiles” (65). (c) “Elect Israelism,” which construes “all Israel” as “a remnant of the descendants of Israel chosen by God” (65). Subsequently, Hahn points out that there are two dominate views concerning the questions: “how” and “when” will all Israel be saved? (a) The position that he defines as “progressivism,” which posits that the salvation of Israel has been ongoing throughout history via the mission of the church” (65). (b) “Futurism,” which posits a mass conversion of Israel will take place at or just before the Parousia of Christ” sometime in the future (65).

Read More A Review of Scott Hahn’s Essay, All Israel Will Be Saved: The Restoration of the Twelve Tribes in Romans 9–11